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REMARKS ON SOME COMMENTS BY MISSIONARY BAPTISTS.

Covington, GA., Sept.1, 1860.

EXTRACT: “There are some things in the history of those who are called anti-missionary Baptists very objectionable, which we intend ere long to notice respectfully, but will do them the justice now to say that in doctrines, their views of baptism, communion, pulpit affiliation, and such like things, they stand upon a platform which the gates of hell shall not prevail against. Business men say that they never lose anything in money transactions with them. It is proverbial that traders are not afraid to trust hard-shell Baptists. Our civil and criminal courts are rarely, if ever, troubled with them, and our sense of justice inclines us thus to write independently of all that some men say. Their greatest mistake has been in stopping too long in Romans, and not going on to the book of Acts. The Bible should be taken as a whole – doctrines, precepts, invitations, promises and ordinances, and blessed is that man who appreciates it in its wonderful and glorious harmony.”


REMARKS: The above we have taken from an article written by the senior Editor of the BANNER AND BAPTIST, a New School, or Missionary paper published in this State, and which was copied into the Tennessee Baptist of the 26th of May last. When those who are not with us in fellowship, but are opposed to us, state facts or the truth concerning the Primitive or Old School Baptists, we conclude they are worthy of attention in our favor as Baptists, but when billingsgate, abuse and misrepresentation are heaped upon us by our enemies, we seldom; if ever, notice it, unless the cause of truth may sometimes demand it. We expect there are things in the history of the Primitive Baptists which are very objectionable to the writer of the above extract, yet to do them justice he says, “that in doctrines, their views of baptism, communion, pulpit affiliation, and such like things, they stand upon a platform which the gates of hell shall not prevail against.” This is an affirmation which carries our history back to a period of antiquity, altogether too ancient for to find any record and authority for Sunday Schools, Bible, Tract and Mission Societies, and like institutions of modern times. If, as the Scriptures teach and is admitted by the writer, that the Primitive Baptist church stand upon Christ the Rock, or platform, against which the gates of hell cannot prevail, what can there be in their history so very objectionable? Their rejection, in modern times, of the Schools, Societies and Institutions which men have invented for religious purposes, is not a new thing with them in principle, but is a distinguishing mark in their history for more than eighteen centuries past. Their spiritual education is in the school of Christ, where Christ is Teacher, and they recognize no other society in religious matters but the church of God, which was visibly set up and instituted by the authority of Christ and his Apostles eighteen hundred years ago. As the prophets went forth and prophesied as the word of the Lord came to them, and the apostles and primitive ministers also went forth as the Lord called and sent them to preach his gospel among all nations; so also the Lord’s ministers, even now, go forth as the faithful heralds of the cross; under the direction and authority of the Great Head of the church, to preach more, travel more, and endure more privations and hardships than any other class of men called preachers in the United States or in the world. Yet this is all ignored, and set at naught by the modern standard of benevolence and religious enterprise. And why? We answer, the Old School Baptists are altogether too PRIMITIVE for these days, too ANCIENT for this progressive age. Again, what can there be in their history so very objectionable? Of course it cannot be anything against their characters as honest, upright and honorable citizens, from the fact that “business men” and “traders” say they never lose anything by them, nor fear to trust them. And if the civil and criminal courts are rarely, if ever, troubled with them, they certainly are not outlaws, nor aiders of abolition insurrections, nor an immoral people, but obedient citizens to the civil governments under which they live, and try, as much as in them is, to live peaceably with all men. The writer, however, intends ere long to notice respectfully some things in their history which are very objectionable. Will he find anything in their history which will conflict with the statement he has made of them in the above extract? He certainly will not eat his own words by any statement counter to what he has already expressed. Their history is written by the finger of God in the book of his remembrance in the archives of heaven, never to be effaced, nor obliterated. While strangers and pilgrims on the earth they are subject to like passions with others, and are liable at times to do wrong, yet this does not change the principle in relation to their doctrine, {not doctrines} faith and general character as Primitive Baptists. He says, however, that “their greatest mistake has been in stopping too long in Romans, and not going on to the book of Acts.” He may have expressed this in the convictions of his own mind, for we will not impugn his motives, but it is only a bugbear that is raised to convey the impression that in some way or other, the Primitive Baptists do not carry out their principles in practice, as though we did not take the Bible as a whole in doctrine and practice. The Primitive Baptists cannot endorse the Mission movements, nor any such like things, for there is, not only no authority for them in Romans, but neither in the book of Acts, nor anywhere else in the Bible. Then we inquire of every candid reader of the Bible, where is the greatest mistake?

J.L. Purington.