Elder David Bartley

THE AUTHOR.

Bartley, Elder David. For a long period of his eventful life Elder Bartley was a citizen of Crawfordsville, md. He was the ninth child and sixth son of Elder John P. and Charity Bartley and was born in Ohio April 26, 1827. In his seventeenth year of age, he was deeply convicted of sin, but was not able to claim a personal hope in the Saviour until about ten years later. During this period of time many were his trials, temptations and deliverances; much his sorrow, sadness and darkness, but out of it all the Lord delivered him, gave him a sweet hope in Jesus and made him willing to be anything in the house of God; and June, 1854, he united with Conn's Creek Church and in January, 1857, was ordained to the gospel ministry. Elder Bartley was not only a deep and instructive preacher, but was an able writer on spiritual subjects. He was a frequent writer for the "Signs of the Times," the "Monitor" and others of our periodicals and also wrote and published the following books: "Early Religious Life" (of himself), "Man Redeemed," and "Mercy Deering." These writings and others of like character manifest his deep spiritual nature and intimate acquaintance with the Bible his chief text-book, Elder Bartley had the care of several churches, traveled and preached in many states and was extensively known among the Baptists of the United States, both as a writer and preacher, and continued active in the ministry almost until his death a few years ago, but the editor's failure to procure proper information forbids an extended notice of his life and labor. - Biographical History of Primitive or Old School Baptist Ministers by R.H. Pittman.

DEDICATION

To all who feel in their hearts that they "have sinned, and come short of the glory of God," who reverently confess their righteous accountability to him, yet feel that they have no self-righteousness to plead, but cry, "God be merciful to me a sinner," this tribute of praise to the Man of the cross, who "came into the world to save sinners," is earnestly commended, as directing their faith and hope to their Crowned King of Glory, "Jesus Christ the Righteous," the successful Advocate with the Father, but their equally dependent friend and servant in the Gospel of Christ.